Posts in category

Raw Materials


The potential for nanofiber

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Industry leaders engage on sustainable solutions and other hot topics in textile fiber applications and technology

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Considering cotton and natural fiber alternatives

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Scotland-based CelluComp has invented a proprietary process that is unique in allowing the properties of cellulose nanofibers (CNF) made from root vegetable waste to be fully utilized.

Nanofiber is a continuous fiber, which has a range of billionths of a meter. As a definition, nanofibers are generally classified as a fiber that is 1 nm to 100 nm, with a length of 100 times or more the diameter. In nonwovens and fabrics, this classification is often extended to include fibers as a …

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Dornbirn GFC director Friedrich Weninger

For the second year running, the Dornbirn Global Fiber Congress (GFC), now in its 60th edition, was held as a virtual event. Besides the ongoing theme of sustainability, there was a strong emphasis on the circular economy and digitalization, as well as discussions on a wide range of topics from fiber innovation to fashion. Synthetic …

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A collection of natural fibers

Cotton was undoubtedly the fiber of the 19th and early 20th centuries and is still by far the world’s most widely used natural fiber. But while cotton is a biodegradable and renewable resource, the use of conventional cotton to produce clothing could decrease going forward as retailers and consumers seek more sustainable alternatives in the …

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roller coupling

In the after-treatment line of polyester staple fiber production, although the fiber strength after drawing is high, because of the large internal stress, the fiber shrinks under the heat action, and the stability is not good. In order to improve the fiber’s thermal stability, it is necessary to eliminate the residual stress due to drafting …

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Coleman Beale, CEO, BastCore

Hemp has a long history as a raw material for American industry. Jamestown settlers introduced hemp to colonial America in the early 1600s for rope, paper, and other fiber-based products; they even imposed fines on those who didn’t produce the crop themselves. U.S. presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp. The U.S. Constitution and …

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