Movers and Shakers – September 2020: Lenzing announces its TENCEL-branded lyocell and modal fibers have been certified carbon zero

Read More

With all-virtual conference program in 2020, RISE continues its quest for the leading edge in material science for engineered fabrics

Read More

Student Spotlight: Reusable textiles for liquid and virus repellency

Read More

At ANTEC® 2016, Gelest, Inc. will be highlighting its silicon-based BIOSAFE® antimicrobial, which it recently acquired after a two-year period of exclusive licensing. Gelest is now shepherding the product through Food Contact approvals from the U.S. FDA and EPA. BIOSAFE antimicrobial imparts bacteriostatic, fungistatic, and algistatic properties to substrates, including plastics, to prevent deterioration and discoloration …

179

Custom Synthetic Fibers, LLC announced May 19, 2016 that a new recycled polyester fiber plant will be operational in mid-summer 2016. The operation, located in Rogersville, Alabama, is owned by a group of individual investors, including the majority owners of Custom Polymers, Inc., a plastics recycler and reprocessor based in Charlotte, NC, and Custom Polymers …

12

Oerlikon announced in April that it has signed an agreement to acquire the entire staple fibers technology portfolio of Trützschler Nonwovens & Man-Made Fibers GmbH, Egelsbach, Germany. This company is part of the German Truetzschler Group, which is a specialist in fiber preparation for the yarn spinning and nonwovens industries. The acquisition expands the Manmade …

14

By Susanne Beyer and Stephan Faulstich

Even in the case of the last five-year plan by the Chinese government, the focus was on sustainable and innovative technologies. Only systems that promise technological and ecological value-added are approved for import. And the same applies to the provision of loans. With this, the highest-capacity market for manmade fiber manufacturing has set an extremely high standard for spinning technologies.

327

By Martin McCoustra and Robert Mather, Heriot-Watt University and Power Textiles Ltd.

Gas plasma treatment technology will be a game changer for processing textiles, and in particular technical textiles. The treatments adapt their surface properties without affecting any of their bulk properties. The plasma technique provides a clean, dry approach that consumes far less energy than do traditional wet treatments, the level of effluent is greatly reduced and, crucially, equipment on an industrial scale is commercially available1.

138